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Philip Schrumpf, DPM
2835 Fort Missoula Road
Physician Center 3, Suite 304
Missoula, MT 59804

Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a common complication of diabetes. These foot wounds are difficult to detect in their early stages and heal slowly and poorly, creating a high risk of infection. Fortunately, it is possible to prevent DFUs. The first step in doing so is to protect your feet. Wear comfortable, well-fitting shoes and avoid walking barefoot, even in the home. Small injuries to the foot can go unnoticed and worsen over time due to the lower limb nerve damage and poor circulation that many diabetics face. Protecting your feet helps to avoid those small injuries. Another important step in preventing DFUs is to inspect the feet daily for any abnormalities, such as cuts, scrapes, sores, discoloration, pain, or strange sensations like tingling and numbness. If you notice anything unusual during a daily inspection, contact a podiatrist as soon as possible. A podiatrist can diagnose and treat foot ulcers before they become too severe.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Philip K. Schrumpf, DPM from Active Feet Clinic. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Missoula, MT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

Plantar fasciitis is the most common source of heel pain. It occurs when the plantar fascia, the band of tissue running along the bottom of the foot that connects the heel to the toes, becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis is usually a result of repetitive overstretching of the plantar fascia. Common contributing factors include having high arches or flat feet, standing on hard surfaces for a long period of time, age (between 40 and 60), being overweight, wearing high heels, and a sudden change in activity level. Plantar fasciitis pain is most prevalent in the middle of the heel and it is usually worse after waking up in the morning or after taking a long rest. Patients who are experiencing heel pain should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to determine what route of treatment should be implemented.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Philip K. Schrumpf, DPM from Active Feet Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Missoula, MT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 12 July 2021 00:00

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 06 July 2021 00:00

While heel pain can sometimes occur due to systemic illnesses such as gout and arthritis, it usually is caused by a condition isolated to the feet. The most common types of local heel pain are: plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, Sever’s disease, bursitis, trapped nerves, and local bruises. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation in the long, fibrous tissue band that connects the heel and toes along the bottom of the foot. Heel spurs are calcium deposits on the heel bone. Because they occur where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel bone, they are sometimes masked by, or occur in tandem with, plantar fasciitis. Sever’s disease is an inflammation of the growth plate at the back of the heel that occurs in growing children. Bursitis is inflammation in the fluid-filled sac (bursa) which cushions the area at the back of the ankle where the heel meets the Achilles tendon. Trapped nerves occur when there is compression on various nerves leading to the heel. Common bruises and bumps to the heel can also cause pain. If you have heel pain, make an appointment with a podiatrist who can determine the root of the problem and create an effective treatment plan.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Philip K. Schrumpf, DPM of Active Feet Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Missoula, MT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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